Monday, August 8, 2011


New parents juggling squirmy squally babies.
I always knew that my children would go through wondrous transformations as they grew and learned and developed as human beings.  And I also knew, albeit vaguely, that Moviedad and I would go through some pretty awesome changes as we grow into our roles as parents.  As far as my own mother was concerned, I knew she would slip into the role of Nana as comfortably as into a soft beloved bathrobe.  

But what I wasn't expecting were the transformations I've been witnessing in the rest of my family members.

The pace of my father's life has slowed enough between his children being babies and the arrival of his grandbabies; he notices and appreciates and comments on the smallest of changes in them.  He made an observation the other day as Gus and Jack were signing and babbling that made my heart swell with pride and validation.  "You can really tell how much time Mo spends with these boys."  Thank you for noticing, Dad!   

Great Grampa is happy to be holding baby Jack!
My grandfather, in his new role as great-grampa, held a baby for the first time!  He had never held any of his children or grandchildren before they were around one year old.  (This bit of news was staggering to me because I always assumed that loving, involved, present man was as comfortable around infants as he was around us kids.) And yet, here he is, holding Jack at their baptism when they were but four months old.  

My sister has learned to juggle two babies as easily as any seasoned mom of twins.  My brother-in-law can now change diapers like a... well, a journeyman maybe.  Not quite a pro, but he's getting there!  

My brother, who was once too cool for family functions, will now call me multiple times on Sundays to know when we're going to arrive at Family Dinner because he and my almost-sister-in-law want to play with the boys.

Big Jack showing the babies where the corn bags go.
And my cousins!  My cousins who haven't really been around babies very much at all absolutely adore Gus and Jack.  They fly the babies to the moon, and hold them ever so patiently while the boys explore the light switches.  They chase them around the yard, or laughingly pause the game of cornhole while curious small and feet commandeer the boards and bags. They graciously give up hats or shoes for the amusement of the babies,  and all sorts of other small acts of play that speak volumes.

I don't know if Gus and Jack will ever truly know the impact their simple existence has had on their extended family.  They have transformed us into better people, just by virtue of being.  

That's love.

That's family.

Brotherly love!